Fox News: ‘It’s not a coincidence’ that ‘we’ve been seeing a big decline in this plant’

A huge number of plants have been shut down in the U.S. due to the opioid epidemic, but one industry leader says it’s not just a coincidence.

Scott Schulman, president of the American Paper Processing Association, said this is a result of a “culture shift” in the United States.

“It’s certainly not a surprise to me, and I know it’s certainly a surprise, but the trend has been growing,” Schulmans said on “Fox & News.”

“What we’ve seen over the last several years is a major shift in the economy and a huge shift in our industry,” he said.

“We’ve been having a tremendous reduction in our jobs and wages and that’s been a real blow to our industry.”

Schulman said a major reason for this shift is the opioid crisis.

“We’re having a massive decline in paper processing and paper processing chemicals in this country, and it’s a trend we’ve been observing for some time,” he told Fox News.

In other states, we’ve lost a huge percentage of our paper workers. “

In some states, it’s down to zero.

In other states, we’ve lost a huge percentage of our paper workers.

So this is certainly not the result of coincidences.”

Schuulman pointed to an analysis of the latest available data from the National Center for Health Statistics, which found that in January 2017, the average paper processing job lost 8.5 percent, or 1,000 jobs, while the average U.K. paper worker lost 3.5 jobs.

He said the same trend has occurred in the industry as the country has been dealing with the opioid drug crisis.

Schulmans cited a number of factors that contributed to the drop in paper jobs in the country, including increased competition and a rise in technology, including electronic filing, faxing and paper creasing.

“There’s a tremendous shift happening,” he explained.

Schunlman said he doesn’t know why the decline in the paper industry is occurring, but he believes the decline is “due to a culture shift” among some companies that have been taking a hands-off approach to dealing with opioid addiction.””

It’s just that there’s a huge amount of innovation in our workforce.”

Schunlman said he doesn’t know why the decline in the paper industry is occurring, but he believes the decline is “due to a culture shift” among some companies that have been taking a hands-off approach to dealing with opioid addiction.

“What I think is really troubling is that the majority of the industry seems to have a culture where they’re very hands-on, they don’t give a damn about the pain and the death,” he added.

Schunman said some of the companies are also not using the information they have from the U,S.

government to make decisions about how they handle the opioid issue.

“I think there’s been this tendency to look at the government and not give a shit about it, to not see that the opioid problem is a national health issue,” he argued.

“That is a problem that has been very prevalent for years.

There’s just been a culture that doesn’t give it any more than a glance.”

Schurman noted that companies in the business of making electronic filing have been reporting that they’ve had to shut down operations because they cannot keep up with demand for paper filing.

“They have had to do a lot of layoffs, and they are going to have to do some more layoffs to keep up,” he warned.

Schurmann said the industry is facing a serious problem with opioid abuse.

“You can see it in the numbers,” he pointed out.

“I can tell you that we have seen this in our facilities across the country.

We have a huge decrease in paper workers, we have a lot more people working on the computers and we’re having to shut them down.”

Schulzman noted a recent study conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics found that about a third of Americans had a high risk of becoming addicted to opioids.

“The numbers just keep on coming out,” he continued.

“These are serious problems that have a very real impact on society.”

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